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A message from BCBSAZ CEO Pam Kehaly on staying physically protected and socially connected

If you've been outside or to the grocery store lately you've probably noticed more and more people wearing face masks. You may see tape on the floor at the checkout line or people driving up to get their groceries. Should you be doing the same? And how will it affect your relationships?

If you’ve been outside or to the grocery store lately you’ve probably noticed more and more people wearing face masks. You may see tape on the floor at the checkout line or people driving up to get their groceries. Should you be doing the same? And how will it affect you socially?

Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that we all wear cloth face masks when we go into public settings where it may be difficult to maintain six feet of distance. Our CEO, Pam Kehaly, shares her thoughts on how this step can flatten the curve and slow the spread of COVID-19.

 

 

Social distancing is a term that’s being used a lot, but what does it really mean? Are we supposed to not socialize with people or just stay apart physically? Now, more than ever, we need to stay connected. We need to keep ourselves healthy by practicing physical distancing, and keep ourselves mentally healthy by practicing social closeness. Learn what our CEO, Pam Kehaly, has been doing to maintain social closeness while physically distancing herself. 

 

 

Protecting yourself and others during this pandemic doesn’t mean separating yourself entirely. You can follow the recommendations provided by the CDC while using other methods to spend quality time communicating with friends and loved ones. BCBSAZ is here for you. Visit azblue.com/coronavirus for more information about COVID-19 and how you can protect yourself and your family. 

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Disclaimer

This information is provided for educational purposes only. Individuals should always consult with their healthcare providers regarding medical care or treatment, as recommendations, services or resources are not a substitute for the advice or recommendation of an individual's physician or healthcare provider. Services or treatment options may not be covered under an individual's particular health plan.